British Virgin Islands Overflight Permit Regulations

British Virgin Islands Overflight Permits Procedures

British Virgin Islands country has its own set of rules, regulations and procedures for permits to aircraft wishing for landing or even entering their air space, whether you’re operating a private, charter flight, scheduled or non-scheduled operation, passengers or cargo trip, a technical or traffic landing, Prior Permission is mandatory required the application procedures requiring complete flight information and Aircraft documents.

According to British Virgin Islands CAA AIP any aircraft owner/operator intent to fly in British Virgin Islands airspace request has to submit for British Virgin Islands overflight clearance to air transport department at least 48 working hours prior from flight departure schedule. Always include AFTN on your flight plan, but you’ll only need an overfly permit from British Virgin Islands.

Planning to make a passenger flight landing or technical stop, British Virgin Islands Airports Authority have their own regulations regarding the issuance of flight British Virgin Islands Overflight permit as there is generally a payment involved. The charges normally payable would be the Route Navigation Facility Charges for overflight and also landing and parking charges in case of aircraft making halts.

British Virgin Islands is a signatory to the Chicago Convention therefore the conditions of flights and crews should strictly be compliant with ICAO general rules of international air traffic and in accordance with their regulation for transport of troops, equipment, materials and dangerous goods, please write us for more detail information.

Required Details for Obtaining British Virgin Islands Overflight Permit


1 - Flight Schedule
2 - Entry / Exit Points with ATC Route
3 - Lead Passenger Details
4 - Consignee & Consigner Details for Cargo Flights
5 - Aircraft Documents [ AOC, COA, COI, CON, COR]

Overflight Permits Category’s for Adhoc and Private


1 - Overflight Permits (Charter Passenger Flights)
2 - Overflight Permits (Private Passenger Flights)
3 - Overflight Permits (Non-Schedule Cargo Flights)

Overflight Permits Category’s for Block :


1 - Monthly Block Overflight Permits (For Scheduled and Non-schedule Airlines Flights)
2 - Seasonal Block Overflight Permits (Scheduled Commercial Airlines Flights)

Permit Validity


- British Virgin Islands Overflight Permit is normally valid for 72 hours.

Overflight Permit Charge's


We do not charge any type of hidden cost in Civil Aviation Permit Processing Cost and British Virgin Islands Overflight Permits Procedures. Our fee is straight and direct without any additional fees in British Virgin Islands Overflight Permit We do not require large upfront deposits or commitments. We strive to develop long term relationships and we work hard to earn your referrals. Besides receiving essential financial monthly reports these very particular customers expect to entirely rely on professional teams and they offer just that. This trust is earned through our administrative and financial control, as well as our services standards of work.

British Virgin Islands Flight Information Region :


British Virgin Islands Airspace is divided into -- Flight Information Regions (FIRs)

1 - N/A


British Virgin Islands FIRs ( Entry / Exit Points ) :



West Bound Entry PointWest Bound Exit PointEast Bound Entry PointEast Bound Exit Point
    

International Trip Support Services


We provide comprehensive and personalized flight planning and trip support services to the corporate aviation industry. Our dedicated and experienced staff work together to ensure you have a smooth trip that is tailored to your particular needs. with years of international flight planning experience, the latest trip coordination technology, and a dedication to high-quality customer service, each member of our knowledgeable team is equipped with the tools to exceed your expectations.

Our proficient flight support team offering unrivalled support services to any International & Domestic Airports in British Virgin Islands along with their expertise, our permit2fly team can arrange British Virgin Islands Overflight Permits for Ad-hoc Charter Flights, Scheduled Airline Seasonal Block Permits from Civil Aviation Authority of British Virgin Islands according to their legal time frame.

Trust Permit2fly, to handle all your ground supervisory at British Virgin Islands airports and obtain British Virgin Islands overflight and Landing permit for any of your aircrafts to operate in the territory of British Virgin Islands.

About British Virgin Islands | History - Geography


The British Virgin Islands, part of a volcanic archipelago in the Caribbean, is a British overseas territory. Comprising 4 main islands and many smaller ones, it's known for its reef-lined beaches and as a yachting destination. The largest island, Tortola, is home to the capital, Road Town, and rainforest-filled Sage Mountain National Park. On Virgin Gorda island is the Baths, a labyrinth of beachside boulders.

British Virgin Islands Overflight Permits Procedures

The Given Below Information Is Extracted from the British Virgin Islands( UK ) AIP


Civilian Formation Flights - ATC Procedures
General

ATC will consider formations to be a single unit for separation purposes provided that:

a) The formation elements are contained within 0.5 nm laterally and longitudinally, and within 100 FT vertically from the formation leader. Within Class G Airspace and subject to ATC approval, these limits may be increased to 3 NM and/or up to 1000 FT vertically.

b) For the purposes of SERA.3135(d) Formation Flights: Military aircraft flying in formation must be flown at a distance not exceeding 1 NM laterally and longitudinally and 30 M (100 FT) vertically from the leading aircraft in the formation.

c) The formation, although operating outside the parameters above, has NSF approval.

The formation leader is responsible for ensuring safe separation between aircraft comprising the formation.

In making initial contact with the ATC unit, the formation leader shall clearly state the number of aircraft in the formation.

Where a flight plan is required, the identification of the formation leader and the number of aircraft in the formation must be shown.

All ATC instructions and clearances will be addressed to the leader.

Controlled Airspace

VFR formation flights by civilian aircraft transiting CTA/CTR/TMA are subject to the normal airspace requirements as detailed at

All other civilian formation flights in Controlled Airspace are subject to NSF approval.

Formations in Controlled Airspace shall be contained within 1 NM laterally and longitudinally and at the same level. Where this is not possible, the formation must be split into individual elements before entering Controlled Airspace. In the event that aircraft within the formation are unable to maintain within these parameters, the formation leader must immediately inform ATC.

Prior to entering Controlled Airspace, the formation leader shall confirm that all aircraft within the formation are within 1 NM laterally and longitudinally, and if in level flight, are at the same level.

When a formation has been cleared to climb or descend in Controlled Airspace, the formation leader shall confirm that all elements have reached the new assigned level.

All aircraft in the formation are to monitor the relevant ATC frequency.

Air Tests With Swanwick(Mil) Within The London FIR

All civil operators wishing to file an airtest using a service provided by Swanwick(Mil) must comply with the following guidance.

Ideally, an air test request form is to be sent prior to midnight (local) the day before the test; this is to ensure that Swanwick(Mil) is able to offer a deconfliction service for the civil operator against busy military flying periods. However, should this notice period not be possible, the request to Swanwick(Mil) is to be made no less than 2 hours prior to the airtest commencing.

If requests are made with only 2 hours notice then these must be made as early in the day as possible; this is to enable controller workload planning. Requests made late in the day are at risk of postponement until the following day.

Captains of test flights are also requested to call the Swanwick(Mil) Supervisor on 01489-612408 prior to engine start to ensure that the Unit has the capacity to provide an Air Traffic Service outside of the civil airways structure.

Note:The above procedure should only be considered as a request for a service to be provided by Swanwick(Mil) and should not be construed as the filing of a flight plan. All normal flight plan procedures should be adhered to.

VFR Flight

VFR flights shall be conducted so that the aircraft is flown in conditions of visibility and distance from clouds equal to or greater than those specified.

Note 1:The VMC minima in Class A Airspace are included for guidance to pilots and do not imply acceptance of VFR flights in Class A Airspace.

Note 2:Flight visibilities reduced to not less than 1500 M are permitted for flights operating:

a) at speeds of 140 KIAS or less to give adequate opportunity to observe other traffic or any obstacles in time to avoid collision.

b) in circumstances in which the probability of encounters with other traffic would normally be low, e.g. in areas of low volume traffic and for aerial work at low levels.

For the purposes of an aeroplane taking off from or approaching to land at an aerodrome within Class B, C or D Airspace, the visibility, if any, communicated to the commander of an aeroplane by the appropriate air traffic control unit shall be taken to be the flight visibility for the time being.

The minimum heights at which aircraft may be flown are detailed at SERA.3105 Minimum Heights. For the purposes of SERA.3105, SERA.5005(f) Visual Flight Rules and SERA.5015(b) Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) — Rules Applicable to all IFR Flights, the following operations are permitted (ORS4 No.1174 ‘Standardised European Rules of the Air – Exceptions to the Minimum Height Requirements).

General

i. The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) permits, under SERA.3105 and SERA.5005(f), subject to the condition set out in subparagraph

ii. an aircraft to fly elsewhere than as specified in SERA.5005(f)(1) at a height of:

• less than 150 M (500 FT) above the ground or water

• less than 150 M (500 FT) above the highest obstacle within a radius of 150 M (500 FT) from the aircraft.

ii. The aircraft must not be flown closer than 150 M (500 FT) to any person, vessel, vehicle or structure except with the permission of the CAA.

Approaches To Landing Or Forced Landings

The Civil Aviation Authority permits, under SERA.3105, SERA.5005(f) and SERA.5015(b), an aircraft to fly below the heights specified in SERA.5005(f) and SERA.5015(b) if it is flying in accordance with normal aviation practice and:

i. practising approaches to land at or checking navigational aids or procedures at an aerodrome

ii. practising approaches to forced landings other than at an aerodrome if it is not flown closer than 150 M (500 FT) to any person, vessel, vehicle or structure.

iii. flying in accordance with a notified procedure or when specifically authorised by the CAA in accordance with SERA.5015(b).

Glider Hill-Soaring

The Civil Aviation Authority permits, under SERA.3105 and SERA.5005(f) a glider to fly below 150 M (500 FT) above the ground or water or closer than 150 M (500 FT) to any person, vessel, vehicle or structure if it is hill-soaring.

Picking Up and Dropping at an Aerodrome

The Civil Aviation Authority permits, under SERA.3105 and SERA.5005(f) an aircraft picking up or dropping tow ropes, banners or similar articles at an aerodrome to fly below 150 M (500 FT) above the ground or water or closer than 150 M (500 FT) to any person, vessel, vehicle or structure.

Maneuvering Helicopters

i. The Civil Aviation Authority permits, under SERA.3105 and SERA.5005(f) a helicopter to fly below 150 M (500 FT) above the ground or water or closer than 150 M (500 FT) to any person, vessel, vehicle or structure if it is conducting maneuvers, in accordance with normal aviation practice, within the boundaries of an aerodrome, permitted sites.

Note:Altitude Band Airspace Class Flight Visibility Distance from Cloud At and above FL 100 A B C D E F G 8 KM 1500 M horizontally 300 M (1000 FT) vertically Below FL 100 and above 900 M (3000 FT) AMSL, or above 300 M (1000 FT) above terrain, whichever is the higher. A B C D E F G 5 KM 1500 M horizontally 300 M (1000 FT) vertically At and below 900 M (3000 FT) AMSL, or 300 M (1000 FT) above terrain, whichever is the higher A B C D E 5 KM 1500 M horizontally 300 M (1000 FT) vertically F G 5 KM

Note:Clear of cloud and with the surface in sight

Civil Aviation Authority
Visual Flight Rules

i. Detailed at sub-paragraph (iii) or, if the operator or pilot-in-command of the aircraft has the written permission of the CAA, at other sites, subject to sub-paragraph (ii).

ii. When flying in accordance with this permission the helicopter must not be operated closer than 60 M to any persons, vessels, vehicles or structures located outside the aerodrome or site.

Permitted Sites

1. Any helicopter landing site which is the main operating base of a PAOC or AOC operator.

2. Any helicopter landing site used by an AOC operator for a helicopter A-to-A operation in accordance with the provisions of the operator's operations manual.

3. Any helicopter landing site located at the premises of a CAA approved aircraft maintenance organization.

In sub-paragraph (iii)

1. 'AOC operator' means a person holding a valid air operator certificate issued by the CAA under the Air Navigation Order (other than a PAOC operator) or under Commission Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 of 5 October 2012.

2. ‘PAOC’ means a person holding a valid air operator certificate issued by the CAA under the Air Navigation Order.

3. ‘A-to-A operation’ means a commercial air transport or public transport helicopter operation starting and ending at the same place (in the Air Navigation Order).

Dropping Articles with CAA Permission

The Civil Aviation Authority permits, under SERA.3105, SERA.5005(f) and SERA.5015(b), an aircraft to fly below 150 M (500 FT) above the ground or water or closer than 150 M (500 FT) to any person, vessel, vehicle or structure if it is flying in accordance with:

i. Air Navigation Order (dropping of articles).

ii. an aerial application certificate granted by the CAA under the Air Navigation Order.

Captive Balloons and Kites

i. The Civil Aviation Authority permits, under SERA.3105, SERA.5005(f) and SERA.5015(b), a captive balloon or kite to be flown at heights below the minimum height requirements specified in SERA.5005 and SERA.5015.

ii. For the purposes of this permission, a captive kite is a kite that, when in flight, is attached by a restraining device to the surface.

Balloons over Congested Areas

The Civil Aviation Authority permits, under SERA.3105 and SERA.5005(f), a free balloon to be flown below 1000 FT above the highest obstacle within a radius of 600 M from the balloon within the congested areas of cities, towns or settlements or over an open air assembly of persons by day if it is landing because it is becalmed.

Special Visual Flight Rules (VFR) Flight and Notified Route

Subject to sub-paragraph (ii), the Civil Aviation Authority permits, under SERA.3105, SERA.5005(c) and SERA.5005(f), an aircraft to fly below 1000 FT above the highest obstacle within a radius of 600 M from the aircraft within the congested areas of cities, towns or settlements if:

1. it is flying on a special VFR flight

2. it is operating in accordance with the procedures notified by the CAA for the route being flown.

• Unless the permission of the CAA has been obtained, landings may only be made by an aircraft flying under this permission at a licensed aerodrome or a Government aerodrome.

• In sub-paragraph (i) a ‘special VFR flight’ means a special VFR flight conducted in accordance with Sections 5 or 8 of SERA.

Except where otherwise indicated in air traffic control clearances or specified by the appropriate ATS authority, it is not mandatory in the United Kingdom for VFR flights in level cruising flight when operated above 3000 FT (900 M) from the ground or water, or a higher datum as specified by the appropriate ATS authority, to adopt any particular cruising level system. Such flights are advised to adopt the table of cruising levels for IFR flights as given at ENR 1.7, paragraph 6.1.

VFR flights shall comply with the provisions of ICAO Annex 2, paragraph 3.6, when operating in Class B, C and D Airspace. Flight Planning requirements and Air Traffic Control Clearances are detailed at SERA.4001-SERA.4020, SERA.5005-SERA.5025, SERA.6001, SERA.8015 and SERA.8020.

Note:A Special VFR clearance may be requested without the submission of a filed flight plan. Brief details of the proposed flight should be passed to the appropriate Air Traffic Control Unit.

ICAO Annex 2 and SERA precludes authorization for VFR flights to operate above FL 290 where a vertical separation minimum of 300 M (1000 FT) is applied above FL 290. Therefore, for aircraft operating as General Air Traffic (GAT), VFR flights shall not be authorized within the London and Scottish UIRs above FL 290, as described in ENR 2.1.

For the purposes of SERA.5005(c) Visual Flight Rules, VFR flight is permitted at night (see ORS4 No.1125 Standardized European Rules of the Air – Visual Flight Rules (VFR) and Special VFR Flight at Night) in accordance with the following criteria:

a) if leaving the vicinity of an aerodrome, a flight plan shall be submitted.

b) flights shall establish and maintain two-way radio communication on the appropriate ATS communication channel, when available.

c) The VMC visibility and distance from cloud minima as specified in SERA Table S5-1 shall apply except that:

• the ceiling shall not be less than 450 M (1500 FT)

• except as specified in (v), the specified reduced flight visibility provisions shall not apply

• in Airspace Classes B, C, D, E, F and G, at and below 900 M (3000 FT) AMSL or 300 M (1000 FT) above terrain whichever is the higher, the pilot shall maintain continuous sight of the surface.

• ceiling, visibility and distance from cloud minima lower than those specified in above may be permitted for helicopters in special cases, such as medical flights, search and rescue operations and fire-fighting.

d) In accordance with SERA.5005 (c)(5), VFR flights in the United Kingdom at night may be flown below a level which is at least 300 M (1000 FT) above the highest obstacle located within 8 KM of the estimated position of the aircraft subject to the conditions at paragraph (e).

e) The conditions specified in paragraph (d) are that the aircraft is flown:

i. at an altitude not exceeding 3000 FT AMSL

ii. clear of cloud and with the surface in sight

iii. at a height not less than 300 M (1000 FT) above the highest obstacle within a radius of 600 M from the aircraft when over the congested areas of cities, towns or settlements or over an open-air assembly of persons.

iv. elsewhere than as specified in sub-paragraph (iii), at a height of more than 150 M (500 FT) above the ground or water, or 150 M (500 FT) above the highest obstacle within a radius of 150 M (500 FT) from the aircraft.

f) The Civil Aviation Authority permits, under SERA.5010(b) (Special VFR in Control Zones), a special VFR flight within a control zone at night in the United Kingdom.

Special VFR Flight

Clearance for Special VFR flight in the UK is an authorization by ATC for a pilot to fly within a Control Zone although he is unable to comply with IFR. In exceptional circumstances, requests for Special VFR flight may be granted for aircraft with an all-up-weight exceeding 5700 KG and capable of flight under IFR. Special VFR clearance is only granted when traffic conditions permit it to take place without hindrance to the normal IFR flights. For meteorological limitations relating to the issuance of SVFR clearances, see SERA 5010.

When operating on a Special VFR clearance, the pilot must comply with ATC instructions and remain at all times in flight conditions which enable him to determine his flight path and to keep clear of obstacles.

Therefore, it is implicit in all Special VFR clearances that the aircraft remains clear of cloud and in sight of the surface. It may be necessary for ATC purposes to impose a height limitation on a Special VFR clearance which will require the pilot to fly either at or not above a specific level.

A full flight plan, Form CA48/RAF2919, is not required for Special VFR flight but ATC must be given brief details of the call sign, aircraft type and pilots intentions. These details may be passed either by RTF or, at busy aerodromes, through the Flight Clearance Office. A full flight plan must be filed if the pilot wishes the destination aerodrome to be notified of the flight.

Requests for Special VFR clearance to enter a Control Zone, or to transit a Control Zone, may be made to the ATC authority whilst airborne. Aircraft departing from aerodromes adjacent to a Control Zone boundary and wishing to enter may obtain Special VFR clearance either prior to take-off by telephone or by RTF when airborne. In any case, all such requests must specify the ETA for the selected entry point and must be made 5-10 minutes beforehand.

ATC will provide standard separation between all Special VFR flights and between such flights and other aircraft under IFR.

A Special VFR clearance within a Control Zone does not absolve the pilot from the responsibility for avoiding an Aerodrome Traffic Zone unless prior permission to penetrate the ATZ has been obtained from the relevant ATC Unit.

Because Special VFR flights are made at the lower levels, it is important for pilots to realize that a Special VFR clearance does not absolve them from the need to comply with the relevant low flying restrictions of SERA.3105 Minimum Heights and SERA.5005.

Visual Flight Rules (unless permitted otherwise by the CAA). In particular, it does not absolve pilots from the requirement that an aircraft, other than a helicopter, flying over congested areas must fly at such a height as would enable it to clear the area and alight without danger to persons or property on the ground in the event of an engine failure and that a helicopter, whether flying over a congested area or not, must fly at such a height as would enable it to alight without danger to persons or property on the ground in the event of an engine failure. In addition there are special rules applicable to flight by helicopters over London (see AD 2.EGLL AD 2.22, paragraphs 9, 11 and 12).

For the purposes of SERA.5010(b) Special VFR in Control Zones, special VFR flight within a control zone is permitted at night in the UK FIRs. (ORS4 No.1125 Standardised European Rules of the Air – Visual Flight Rules (VFR) and Special VFR Flight at Night).

Radio Communication Failure Procedures

The procedures to be adopted by pilots experiencing two-way radio communication failure are:

a) If the aircraft is suitably equipped, operate the Transponder on Mode A, Code 7600 and Mode C.

b) If it is believed that the radio communication transmitter is functioning, transmit blind giving position reports and stating intentions