Canada Overflight Permit Regulations

Canada Overflight Permits Procedures

Canada country has its own set of rules, regulations and procedures for permits to aircraft wishing for landing or even entering their air space, whether you’re operating a private, charter flight, scheduled or non-scheduled operation, passengers or cargo trip, a technical or traffic landing, Prior Permission is mandatory required the application procedures requiring complete flight information and Aircraft documents.

According to Canada CAA AIP any aircraft owner/operator intent to fly in Canada airspace request has to submit for Canada overflight clearance to air transport department at least 48 working hours prior from flight departure schedule. Always include AFTN on your flight plan, but you’ll only need an overfly permit from Canada.

Planning to make a passenger flight landing or technical stop, Canada Airports Authority have their own regulations regarding the issuance of flight Canada Overflight permit as there is generally a payment involved. The charges normally payable would be the Route Navigation Facility Charges for overflight and also landing and parking charges in case of aircraft making halts.

Canada is a signatory to the Chicago Convention therefore the conditions of flights and crews should strictly be compliant with ICAO general rules of international air traffic and in accordance with their regulation for transport of troops, equipment, materials and dangerous goods, please write us for more detail information.

Required Details for Obtaining Canada Overflight Permit


1 - Flight Schedule
2 - Entry / Exit Points with ATC Route
3 - Lead Passenger Details
4 - Consignee & Consigner Details for Cargo Flights
5 - Aircraft Documents [ AOC, COA, COI, CON, COR]

Overflight Permits Category’s for Adhoc and Private


1 - Overflight Permits (Charter Passenger Flights)
2 - Overflight Permits (Private Passenger Flights)
3 - Overflight Permits (Non-Schedule Cargo Flights)

Overflight Permits Category’s for Block :


1 - Monthly Block Overflight Permits (For Scheduled and Non-schedule Airlines Flights)
2 - Seasonal Block Overflight Permits (Scheduled Commercial Airlines Flights)

Permit Validity


- Canada Overflight Permit is normally valid for 72 hours.

Overflight Permit Charge's


We do not charge any type of hidden cost in Civil Aviation Permit Processing Cost and Canada Overflight Permits Procedures. Our fee is straight and direct without any additional fees in Canada Overflight Permit We do not require large upfront deposits or commitments. We strive to develop long term relationships and we work hard to earn your referrals. Besides receiving essential financial monthly reports these very particular customers expect to entirely rely on professional teams and they offer just that. This trust is earned through our administrative and financial control, as well as our services standards of work.

Canada Flight Information Region :


Canada Airspace is divided into 07 Flight Information Regions (FIRs)

1 - Edmonton (CZEG) FIR

2 - Gander (CZQX) FIR

3 - Moncton (CZQM) FIR

4 - Montreal (CZUL) FIR

5 - Toronto (CZYZ) FIR

6 - Vancouver (CZVR) FIR

7 - Winnipeg (CZWG) FIR


Canada FIRs ( Entry / Exit Points ) :



West Bound Entry PointWest Bound Exit PointEast Bound Entry PointEast Bound Exit Point
LABRELABREEMBIMEMBIM
PINTEPINTEGRINSGRINS
ATENEATENEDOLFFDOLFF
DEPRIDEPRISPONJSPONJ
MEKSOMEKSOKURTTKURTT
EBGIXEBGIXKATCHKATCH
EPMOKEPMOKBBGVPBBGVP
UKNIXUKNIXHWTCCHWTCC
CFHBFCFHBFDPCXGDPCXG
KATNOKATNOMAGNM MAGNM
RAKAPRAKAPDUVOT DUVOT
MKPDGMKPDG  
RIBIRRIBIR  
KJDPLKJDPL  
CFRTQCFRTQ  
ZOMTAZOMTA  
EDGESEDGES  

International Trip Support Services


We provide comprehensive and personalized flight planning and trip support services to the corporate aviation industry. Our dedicated and experienced staff work together to ensure you have a smooth trip that is tailored to your particular needs. with years of international flight planning experience, the latest trip coordination technology, and a dedication to high-quality customer service, each member of our knowledgeable team is equipped with the tools to exceed your expectations.

Our proficient flight support team offering unrivalled support services to any International & Domestic Airports in Canada along with their expertise, our permit2fly team can arrange Canada Overflight Permits for Ad-hoc Charter Flights, Scheduled Airline Seasonal Block Permits from Civil Aviation Authority of Canada according to their legal time frame.

Trust Permit2fly, to handle all your ground supervisory at Canada airports and obtain Canada overflight and Landing permit for any of your aircrafts to operate in the territory of Canada.

About Canada | History - Geography


Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 million square kilometers, making it the world's second-largest country by total area.

Canada Overflight Permits Procedures

The Given Below Information Is Extracted from the Canada AIP


Air Traffic Services Airspace

A FIR is an airspace of defined dimensions extending upwards from the surface of the earth, within which a flight information service (FIS) and an alerting service are provided. The Canadian Domestic Airspace (CDA) is divided into the Vancouver, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Toronto, Montréal, Moncton and Gander domestic FIRs.

Gander Oceanic is an additional FIR allocated to Canada by ICAO for the provision of an FIS and an alerting service over the high seas.

Terminal Control Areas

A TCA is a controlled airspace of defined dimensions, normally established in the vicinity of a major aerodrome, designated to serve arriving, departing and enroute aircraft.

Units Providing the Service

There is an ACC providing service for each FIR. The telephone numbers for the ACCs are provided in Table 1.9, “ACC Contact Numbers.”

Call Sign of Aeronautical Stations

The call signs for the ACCs are as follows: Gander Centre, Moncton Centre, Montréal Centre, Toronto Centre, Winnipeg Centre, Edmonton Centre, and Vancouver Centre. For information on the language used by the aeronautical station, refer to GEN 3.4.3, “Types of Service.”

Frequencies Supplemented by Indications for Specific Purposes

For frequencies supplemented by indications for specific purposes, see the enroute low altitude, enroute high altitude and terminal area charts (see Figure 3.1, “Index to Low Altitude Charts,” and Figure 3.2, “Index to High Altitude Charts”).

Control Zones Around Military Air Bases

For information on control zones around military air bases, refer to the following publications:

Canada Flight Supplement or Water Aerodrome Supplement, Section B, “Aerodrome/Facility Directory,” and Canada Flight Supplement, Section E, “Military Flight Data and Procedures”

Emergency Locator Transmitter Requirements

For information on emergency locator transmitter (ELT) requirements, refer to GEN 1.5.4, “Emergency Locator Transmitter.”

Other Regulated Airspace
Required Navigation Performance Capability Airspace

Required navigation performance capability (RNPC) airspace is defined as a controlled airspace within the Canadian Domestic Airspace (CDA) in the Designated Airspace Handbook (TP 1820E; see Figure 2.2.2, “RNPC, CMNPS and CMNPS Transition Airspace”). RNPC airspace accommodates area navigation (RNAV) operations and is contained within the Southern Domestic Airspace (SDA) and Northern Control Area (NCA).

Reduced ATC separation criteria can be applied in RNPC airspace. To conduct RNAV operations (fixed or random routes) in the RNPC airspace, the required aircraft navigation equipment must be certified as capable of navigating within specified tolerances. Aircraft that have the required navigation equipment for operations in Canadian minimum navigation performance specifications (CMNPS) airspace and the minimum navigation performance specifications (MNPS) authorization required in the North Atlantic (NAT) high level airspace (HLA) satisfy all requirements for RNPC.

Separation in accordance with RNPC may be applied for flights within those portions of the Gander Oceanic and New York Oceanic flight information regions (FIRs) that are designated as being part of the Gander Domestic or Moncton Domestic control area (CTA).

RNAV operations require the following additional certifications:

• The aircraft must be certified by the State of Registry or the State of the Operator as meeting the RNPC permitted to conduct RNAV operations.

• Long-range RNAV systems must be certified and capable of navigation performance that permits position determination within ±4 NM. Such navigation performance capability must be verified by the State of Registry or the State of the Operator, as appropriate.

• One long-range RNAV system, plus a short-range navigation system (VHF omnidirectional range (VOR)/distance measuring equipment (DME), or automatic direction finder (ADF)), must be certified to meet the minimum navigation equipment requirement for RNPC operation.

Canadian Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications Airspace

Reduced ATC separation criteria can be applied in the CMNPS airspace. To conduct RNAV operations in CMNPS airspace, aircraft must be certified as being capable of navigating within specified tolerances. A transition area underlying the lateral limits of CMNPS airspace exists from FL 270 to below FL 330 to permit both CMNPS-certified and non-certified aircraft to operate above FL 270.

Aircraft navigation equipment for flights in CMNPS airspace must meet the following conditions and certifications:

Navigation equipment must be certified by the State of Registry or the State of the Operator as meeting the MNPS of either the NAT or Canada to operate within CMNPS airspace, unless the ATC unit concerned indicates that the non-certified aircraft can be accommodated without penalty to certified aircraft.

Required long-range RNAV systems must be certified and shown capable of navigation performance within the following specifications:

• The standard deviation of lateral track errors is less than 6.3 NM.

• The proportion of total flight time spent by aircraft 30 NM or more off the cleared track is less than 5.3 x 10-4 (i.e., less than 1 hr in about 2,000 flight hours).

• The proportion of total flight time spent by aircraft between 50 and 70 NM off the cleared track is less than 13 x 10-5 (i.e., less than 1 hr in about 8,000 flight hours).

Navigation performance capability must be verified by the State of Registry or the State of the Operator, as appropriate. Aircraft that operate within designated airways and company-approved routes, which are completely in signal coverage of ground-based navigation aids, satisfy CMNPS requirements when operating within the protected airspace for airways and company-approved routes.

At a minimum, aircraft are required to use the following navigation systems in the CMNPS airspace, depending on the route operated:

• Aircraft transiting CDA to or from another continent must be equipped with two long-range RNAV systems or one navigation system using the inputs from one or more sensor systems, plus one short-range navigation system (ADF, VOR/DME).

• Aircraft operating within North America on routes that lie within reception of ground-based navigation aids must be equipped with a single long-range RNAV system plus a short-range navigation system (ADF, VOR/DME).

• Aircraft operating on high-level airways or company-approved routes must be equipped with dual short-range navigation systems (ADF, VOR/DME).

ATS Routes

For route descriptions, distances are in nautical miles and tracks are magnetic, except in the Northern Domestic Airspace (NDA) where tracks are referenced to true north.

Lower ATS Routes
Route Descriptions

For detailed descriptions of specific lower altitude ATS routes, refer to current editions of the following publications:

The appropriate enroute low altitude chart (see Figure 3.1, “Index to Low Altitude Charts”).

Tracks or VOR Radials

For information on tracks or very high frequency (VHF) omnidirectional range (VOR) radials, including changeover points, for low altitude ATS routes, see the appropriate enroute low altitude chart.

Upper and Lower Limits of Routes and Airspace Classification

The airspace up to but not including 18 000 feet ASL within CDA and that airspace over international waters and foreign territory in which Canada accepts responsibility for the provision of ATC services is for use by low altitude routes.

For information on the upper and lower limits of low altitude ATS routes and airspace classification, see the appropriate enroute low altitude chart.

Lateral Limits

For information on the lateral limits of low altitude ATS routes, see the appropriate enroute low altitude chart.

Direction of Cruising Levels

For information on the direction of cruising levels for low altitude ATS routes, see the appropriate enroute low altitude chart and refer to the following publications:

Canada Flight Supplement or Water Aerodrome Supplement, Section C, “Planning – Characteristics of Airspace – Cruising Altitudes and Flight Levels Appropriate to Aircraft Track”

Controlling Unit and Operating Frequency

For further information, including an indication of the controlling unit and its operating frequency for low altitude ATS routes, see the appropriate enroute low altitude chart.

Upper ATS Routes
Route Descriptions

For detailed descriptions of specific high altitude ATS routes, refer to current editions of the following publications:

• The appropriate enroute high altitude chart (see Figure 3.2, “Index to High Altitude Charts”)

• Canada Flight Supplement, Section C, “Planning”

Tracks or VOR Radials

For information on tracks or VOR radials, including changeover points, for high altitude ATS routes, see the appropriate enroute high altitude chart.

Upper and Lower Limits of Routes and Airspace Classification

The airspace at 18 000 feet ASL and above within CDA and that airspace over international waters and foreign territory in which Canada accepts responsibility for the provision of ATC services is for use by high altitude routes.

For information on the upper and lower limits of high altitude ATS routes and airspace classification, see the appropriate enroute high altitude chart.

Lateral Limits

For information on the lateral limits of high altitude ATS routes, see the appropriate enroute high altitude chart.

Direction of Cruising Levels

For information on the direction of cruising levels for high altitude ATS routes, see the appropriate enroute high altitude chart and refer to the following publications:

Canada Flight Supplement or Water Aerodrome Supplement, Section C, “Planning – Characteristics of Airspace – Cruising Altitudes and Flight Levels Appropriate to Aircraft Track”

Controlling Unit and Operating Frequency

For further information, including an indication of the controlling unit and its operating frequency for high altitude ATS routes, see the appropriate enroute high altitude chart.

Area Navigation Routes
Description of Area Navigation Routes

For a description of area navigation (RNAV) routes, refer to the following publication:

Canada Flight Supplement, Section C, “Planning – Mandatory IFR Routes – Fixed RNAV Routes” and Section E, “Military Flight Data and Procedures”

Waypoints Defining VOR/DME Area Navigation Routes

For station identification of the reference VOR/distance measuring equipment (DME) defining an RNAV route, refer to the following publications:

Canada Flight Supplement, Section D, “Radio Navigation and Communications – Radio Navigation Aids by Location,” or Canada Flight Supplement and Water Aerodrome Supplement, Section D, “Radio Navigation Aids by Indicator”

For bearing and distance from the reference VOR/DME, if the waypoint defining an RNAV route is not collocated with it, refer to the following publication:

Canada Flight Supplement, Section C, “Planning – Mandatory IFR Routes – Fixed RNAV Routes”

For elevation of the transmitting antenna of the DME defining an RNAV route, refer to the following publications:

Canada Flight Supplement, Section D, “Radio Navigation and Communications – Radio Navigation Aids by Location,” or Canada Flight Supplement and Water Aerodrome Supplement, Section D, “Radio Navigation Aids by Indicator”

Distance Between Defined End Points and Designated Significant Points

For geodesic distance between defined end points and distance between each successive designated significant point for RNAV routes, refer to the following publication:

Canada Flight Supplement, Section C, “Planning – Mandatory IFR Routes – Fixed RNAV Routes”

Upper and Lower Limits of Routes and Airspace Classification

For information on the upper and lower limits of RNAV routes and airspace classification, see the appropriate enroute low altitude chart, enroute high altitude or terminal area chart (see Figure 3.1, “Index to Low Altitude Charts,” and Figure 3.2, “Index to High Altitude Charts”).

Direction of Cruising Levels

For information on the direction of cruising levels for RNAV routes, see the appropriate enroute low altitude chart, enroute high altitude or terminal area chart.

Controlling Unit and Operating Frequency

For further information, including an indication of the controlling unit and its operating frequency for RNAV routes, see the appropriate enroute low altitude chart, enroute high altitude or terminal area chart.

Helicopter Routes

There are no established helicopter routes in Canada.

Enroute Holding
Holding Identification and Holding Fix

For the holding identification and the holding fix for enroute holding patterns, see current editions of the following publications:

The appropriate enroute low altitude, enroute high altitude or terminal area chart (see Figure 3.1, “Index to Low Altitude Charts,” and Figure 3.2, “Index to High Altitude Charts”)

Canada Air Pilot, Volumes 1–7, or Restricted Canada Air Pilot

Inbound Track

For the inbound track for enroute holding patterns, see current editions of the following publications:

The appropriate enroute low altitude, enroute high altitude or terminal area chart

Canada Air Pilot, Volumes 1–7, or Restricted Canada Air Pilot

Direction of Procedure Turn

For the direction of the procedure turn for enroute holding patterns, see current editions of the following publications:

The appropriate enroute low altitude, enroute high altitude or terminal area chart

Canada Air Pilot, Volumes 1–7, or Restricted Canada Air Pilot

Maximum Indicated Airspeed

The size of the airspace that must be protected for a holding pattern is directly proportional to the speed of the aircraft. In order to limit the amount of airspace that must be protected, maximum holding speeds in knots indicated airspeed (KIAS) have been designated for specific altitude ranges. Unless otherwise noted on the chart or when a climb in the hold is specified, holding patterns must be entered and flown at or below the following airspeeds:

Table 3.6.4, Maximum Indicated Airspeeds for Holding Patterns

Altitude (ASL)Maximum Holding Airspeed (KIAS)
At or below 6000 feet200
Above 6000 feet up to and including 14000 feet230
Above 14000 feet265
Shuttle climbs (all altitudes)310 (subject to CAR 602.32)

Note 1:At Canadian Military airfields, the size of the protected airspace is for a maximum of 310 KIAS, unless otherwise noted.

Note 2:For Copter procedures, the maximum airspeed is 90 KIAS for all altitudes, unless otherwise noted.

When a climb in the hold (shuttle climb) procedure is specified on a chart, an additional protected area has been provided to allow for greater airspeeds in the climb for those aircraft requiring them. This extra protected area is for a maximum of 310 KIAS, unless a maximum holding airspeed is noted on the chart, in which case that maximum airspeed is applicable.

In areas where turbulence is known to exist, the protected airspace is based on a maximum of 280 KIAS and will be noted on the chart.

Pilots are to advise ATC immediately if airspeeds in excess of those specified become necessary for any reason, including turbulence, or if they are unable to accomplish any part of the holding procedure.

Minimum and Maximum Holding Level

For minimum and maximum holding levels for enroute holding patterns, see current editions of the following publications:

The appropriate enroute low altitude, enroute high altitude or terminal area chart

Time and Distance Outbound

The still air time for flying the outbound leg of a holding pattern should not exceed one minute if at or below 14 000 feet ASL, or one and a half minutes if above 14 000 feet ASL. However, the pilot should make due allowance in both heading and timing to compensate for the wind effect.

After the initial circuit of the holding pattern, timing should begin abeam the holding fix or on attaining the outbound heading, whichever occurs later. The pilot should increase or decrease outbound times, in recognition of winds, to effect one minute or one and a half minutes still air time (appropriate to altitude) inbound to the holding fix.

When the pilot receives ATC clearance specifying the time of departure from the holding fix, adjustments should be made to the flight pattern within the limits of the established holding pattern to leave the holding fix as near as possible to the time specified.

Controlling Unit and Operating Frequency

For indication of the controlling unit and its operating frequency for enroute holding patterns, see current editions of the following publications:

The appropriate enroute low altitude, enroute high altitude or terminal area chart